Best of March 2020

Fairies, Tiny Trucks, and a Mystery GameClue Junior board game for kids Fairy Queen card game for kids and Driven Pocket series little garbage truck and cement mixer on road pieces

  • What: Most popular posts
  • When: March 2020
  • Why: See what other people read
  • Where: At home

While the country dealt with the effects of the coronavirus, including quarantines and having school cancelled with minimal notice, visitors read these posts most often in the month of March.

Fairy Queen card game for kids box with sliding tray, nature inspired cards, fairy cards and instructions

Fairy Queen Card Game: Looking for a new card game your kids can play? Fairy Queen serves up two games in one beautifully illustrated deck. Kids can play a version of Memory, flipping over cards to get a match. Or they can split the deck between players and compete to see who can get the most matches. No matter which way you play, tally up points to determine the winner. The forest-inspired flora and fauna count for two points per pair, while the fairy matches count for five points. Find the Fairy Queen herself for a ten point boost. Kids learn skip counting by both twos and fives without any complaints about math.

Driven pocket series little cars cement mixer and garbage truck with tiny road signs on connecting road pieces

Driven Pocket Series Set: It’s no surprise to see this post featured in yet another month’s most popular posts. These tiny toys cost next to nothing, come with a small vehicle, three pieces of road that can connect, and even some tiny road signs. Collecting them and making various combinations can keep kids entertained for hours while making minimal noise to avoid disturbing parents stuck working from home. And these tiny toys clean up easily and take up only a small fraction of space, all without any need for batteries or screen time.

Clue Junior The Case of the Missing Cake kids board game

Clue Junior: If your kids need a problem to solve not related to any current pandemics, look no further than the younger version of the popular Clue game. Kids need minimal reading skills to solve the disappearance of the cake by one of six brightly colored characters. They need to discern who ate the cake, with what drink, and in which room. By visiting each room and looking under pieces of furniture and figures, kids can collect clues in the classic whodunnit. Made for two to four players ages five years and up, kids can also play on their own if necessary.

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