Best Interactive Books for Small Kids

Reach Out and Touch SomethingInteractive board books for infants toddlers preschoolers Cheerios Play book Usborne touch and feel Alphaprints and Scanimation Swing!

  • What: Best interactive books
  • When: 6 months to three years
  • Why: Foster a love of books
  • Where: At home

Sometimes words just aren’t enough, especially when it comes to the zero to three year olds. They want to touch, move, and explore everything around them. If you want to inspire a love for books in your young child, or would just like to keep little hands busy while you read together, look no further than these interactive pages.

Hi Ho Cheerios: Ue real Cheerios cereal pieces to complete the pictures on each page. From adding wheels to a car or buttons on a shirt, these board books make food and mealtimes fun. With four different versions to choose from, including the original and animal, Halloween, and Christmas themes, you’re sure to find one or more your child will love.

Scanimation Picture Books: Flip the pages to put the pictures in motion. Scanimation’s unique illusion of movement will capture readers young and old. With a variety of books to choose from, you can’t go wrong with these black and white images paired with fun rhyming text.

Alphaprints Touch and Feel board book Tweet!Tweet!

Alphaprints Touch and Feel Books: These touch and feel books use fingerprints paired with photographs to create unique images. Kids can touch the embossed ridges along with all the other textures to explore in this range of board books made just for them.

Steering wheel boo

Steering Wheel Books: Get set to explore with these sound books, which include a moving steering wheel that triggers even more sounds. Paired with buttons to press in one of several vehicle themes, kids can enjoy sitting in the driver’s seat with these board books, making them perfect for engaging little ones.

That's not my hedgehog by Usborne books touchy feely

Usborne Touch and Feel Books: Each board book in this series explores a different animal or item by examining and comparing its features. Whether it’s bumpy or rough, fuzzy or smooth, the variety of textures invites little hands to reach out. Combined with patches of texture that accompanies the text, kids can get a feel for matching words to meanings thanks to these fun, repetitive reads.

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